Introduction to Intellectual Disability

Introduction to Intellectual Disability

Order Description

Details: Special educator is Sarah…Regular educator is Nora
Washington state education laws

Create your special education (SPED) team for this course. Include at least one special and one regular educator. For assignments in this course, you will need to work in the classroom with students with intellectual disability (ID), their parents, and members of community organizations.

Interview a special educator and a regular educator of students with ID. Focus on addressing the following:

1. Issues relating to terminology, law, and identification of ID

2. Issues surrounding the definition and classification of students with ID

3. The impact of characteristics of ID on learning, social attitudes, and curricular needs

Compare the viewpoints of the instructors and summarize your learning experience in an essay of 1,000-1,250 words.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

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virtule child


virtule child

Order Description

use the name Sofia for the child name.. Please use this text book for one of the references..
Child Development Robert s. Feldman 7th 2016

Author: Rose Powell
Australian dollar’s next stop? US65¢ predicted as commodity prices decline
by Rose Powell
Falling commodities prices have slammed the currencies of resource and agriculture-heavy
economies, including Australia, where analysts are forecasting the dollar to weaken further, possibly
to US65¢.
Major fund manager BlackRock is forecasting a continued slide to US70¢ by the end of the year.
Capital Economics went further, anticipating an even faster fall to US65¢ by the end of 2016.
On Friday the Australian dollar was trading at US74¢, down 1.51 per cent in the past week.
The currencies of commodity-heavy economies such as Australia are the worst-performing this year
as falling commodity prices pressuring similar countries New Zealand and Canada to cut interest
rates as markets ready for them to continue to drop.
2
While Australia grapples with lower key commodity value such as iron ore, deteriorating commodity
prices forced the Bank of Canada to lower its benchmark to 0.5 per cent in a bid to stimulate the
economy on Thursday night.
New Zealand is also expected to cut rates again, from 3.25 per cent to 3 per cent as dairy prices
continue to decline.
“The dollars of Australia, New Zealand and Canada have been three of the worst-performing major
currencies so far this year. Despite the fact that they have already fallen a long way, we expect them
to weaken further,” Capital Economics John Higgins said.
Commonwealth Bank chief currency strategist Richard Grace said the declining commodity prices
were creating huge and sustained impact on the dollar and economy.
“The dollar is very sensitive to commodity prices,” Mr Grace said. “Commodity prices and terms of
trade are the clearest long-run indicators for the Australian dollar and economy.”
He added interest rates were likely to stay low or be cut again as the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA)
dealt with below-trend gross domestic product and softer domestic demand that is placing upwards
pressure on unemployment.
If the dollar declines too far, Australia’s terms of trade could become so steep that businesses cut
back on importing new technologies, influencing their international competitiveness, which flows
through to employment concerns.
“Capital imports have been falling for a few years because mining investment has slowed so much,”
Mr Grace said. “We’ve not seen a threshold with the dollar crossed yet, but it would be difficult for
retailers to raise prices amid upward pressure on unemployment.”
Commodity prices are likely to continue to decline. Last week, the International Monetary Fund
revised down its forecast for global growth, indicating the glut of commodities is likely to push prices
down as demand slows.
3
“Financial markets are pricing in about an 80 per cent chance of an additional interest rate cut [in
Australia] by February 2016,” Mr Grace said.
Capital Economics is anticipating an interest rate cut of 0.5 per cent to 1.5 per cent by the RBA before
the March 2016.
While Australia, Canada and New Zealand are preparing to cut rates, the United States and United
Kingdom are likely to raise rates later this year, which would cause a further decline in value for the
Aussie.
The greenback reached a six-week high at the end of the week as the European Central Bank
announced liquidity boosting measures for Greece.
Fairfax Media Australia
Assignment
From the article titled ‘Australian dollar’s next stop? US65¢ predicted as commodity prices
decline’ (Australian Financial Review July 17, 2015), answer the following questions.
(a) Briefly summarise the main issues discussed in this article? [Not exceeding 200 words] –
(25 Marks)
(b) Using Demand and Supply model of exchange rate determination briefly explain how
AUD is determined in the forex market, and what factors influence its fluctuations. – (15
Marks)
(c) Using exchange rate data from Reserve Bank of Australia and graphs (monthly data of
last three years) analyse the movement of AUD relative to that of the US dollar? Is it in line
with the world commodity price movement during this period? Are there any other factors
contributing to this behaviour of the Australian dollar? – (25 Marks)
(d) Do you think that the AUD will fall as low as US 65C by the end of 2016? Justify your
answer. What advantages do you think Australia will have in such a scenario? – (15 Marks)
(e) If the market rate is US 65C then what action could the Reserve Bank of Australia take in
order to maintain the exchange rate at US 70C, and what side effects might this action have
on the Australian economy? Do you think that such actions would be effective? – (20 Marks)
Word Limit: 2000 words maximum. Word count (excluding references) must be provided.
Excess words will not be marked.

4
Instructions
1. This assignment is marked out of 100 and is worth 25 per cent of overall marks.
2. At least 4 relevant references are required regarding the issue featured in your
allocated topic.
3. Turnitin Report: It will be compulsory for all students to submit the written
assignment (final version) into the Turnitin system before submitting the hard copy to
the tutor. Students are encouraged to submit drafts of the assignment before the due
date, enabling students to check their referencing and rectify any issues before
submission of the final version.
a. In the absence of the submission of the Turnitin report, a zero mark will be
awarded for this assignment task.
b. A similarity index of less than 10 per cent is expected in your assignment.
Zero tolerance applies for plagiarism
4. Hand in your hard copy of the assignment to the tutor on or before Week 8 of
Trimester 3. Penalty applies for late submission.

ECON910 Trimester 3 2015
Case Study – Marking Guide
Marks are allocated according to the following criteria:
Analytical Ability 60%
Research depth 20%
Presentation 10%
References 10%
Analytical Ability:
Correct understanding of the question(s)
Definition/explanation of key concepts
Analysis/discussion of the question ensuring a meaningful flow of ideas in
relation to the main theme
Adequate data are presented and graphs properly drawn (where
necessary)
Relevancy of material presented
Display of theoretical knowledge as necessary
Adequacy/coverage of the topic
When you answer each part of the topic, please ensure to meet the above
requirements. Marks are allocated as follows:
Part a – 15 marks
Part b – 09 marks
Part c – 15 marks
Part d – 09 marks
Part e – 12 marks
Total 60 marks
Research Depth:
Evidence of wider reading relevant to the question/s, and justification of
strong comments/arguments with appropriate references in the text.
Relevant data/information gathered from reliable sources. (20 marks)
Presentation:
General formatting (space, paragraphing, page break etc.)
Grammar and spelling checks
Appendices if appropriate
Assignment cover sheet/ signed as own (10 marks)
Tables/graphs, if applicable, are properly prepared and labelled
References:
List of references (minimum 4 relevant references) attached
Inclusion of all in- text references in the List
Harvard Style followed (author date system)
Alphabetical order followed
(Excessive use of web sources should be avoided) (10 marks)
Marks will be reduced for:
Cut, copy and paste,
Evidence of plagiarism /collaboration,
Late submission
Cautionary Note:
Turnitin submissions should be made prior to hard copy submission.
When you submit your written assessment to Turnitin, the system generates an
‘originality report’ that highlights the similarity found between the
assessment and all the sources
Turnitin does not check that references are in the correct Harvard format.
No submissions of Turnitin Report with Essay – 0 marks.
Above 10% similarity results in penalty
Hard copy submission should be made in the tutorial hour in Week 8.

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Information Literacy for Business and Social Science

Information Literacy for Business and Social Science

Module 5: References and Citations
Annotated Bibliography Homework
Purpose:  To develop skills in creating an annotated bibliography (reference entries, “Works Cited with Annotations”
•    In an annotated bibliography, the APA reference entry is followed with a comment (a couple of sentences it could be a good deal more) explaining the significance of or providing a brief critique of the work cited.
•    Note:  Normally, a Reference List with annotations (Annotated Bibliography) would be in author order, but you should insert your references in the following document in the order provided by the questions below.
•    You may only use a reference once even if it fits more than one category.  The references can be about different topics.
•    All annotations should discuss the references and make comments as appropriate; sometimes the annotation includes a specific task.  In this homework, all of the references need to be annotated and sometimes there is an added requirement regarding the way you need to state the annotation part.  Hint:  Here is a reminder of some of our key vocabulary that might prove helpful in writing some of the annotations.
•    Authoritative v. non-authoritative
•    Primary v. secondary v. tertiary source
•    Scholarly v. popular v. trade publication
•    Factual v. analytical
•    Biased v. unbiased

Here is the list of the 12 sources you need to locate.  For example, in #1 you need to supply an online scholarly reference in proper APA format and in the annotation section which follows, you should justify that the particular reference is scholarly.
1.  Scholarly Article (online)

2.  Scholarly Book (Book also must be from the PN catalog category in the library; include catalog reference in your annotation)

3.  Article from a Trade Periodical

4.  Work of fiction found via the Library Database (in the annotation include information regarding the database used)

5.  Article in Wikipedia  (include description of article in annotation; your annotation should be of a factual nature)

6.  Article via Wikipedia (article or work whose reference is found in a Wikipedia article; you will have to describe the Wikipedia article in your annotation since the reference entry is only for the article itself.)

7.  Article or book or website with suspected biases (make sure to tell in your annotation why there is suspected bias in your annotation)

8. Non-fiction work which is a primary source (explain why it is primary in your annotation)

9.Reference which is a secondary source (explain why it is secondary in your annotation)

10.  Reference to a blog (annotation should include a good description of the blog, author(s) and intended audience)

11.  Reference to an original poem about forests or trees.

12.  Reference to a Picture found online (include the picture in your annotation;they should not be too big; jpg format)

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Crime/Prevention and Community Spring 2015

Crime/Prevention and Community Spring 2015

School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Please read this document and the accompanying SSAPguide very carefully for everything you need to know about the unit.
If you need help, check both (and your unit vUWS site) first. If you still need help, please contact us as per Section 2.1 of the SSAPguide.
Unit Weekly Schedule Follows on next page for your convenience
Section 1: Unit Information
• Unit code and name
• Unit coordinator
• Credit points
• Teaching session
• Welcome and key contacts
• Consultation arrangements
• Requirements other than those listed below
• Improvements made recently to unit
• Delivery: How unit is delivered
• Attendance requirements
• Textbook
• Essential readings
• Other resources
• Referencing requirements
Section 2: Assessment Information
• Course learning outcomes
• Unit learning outcomes
• How unit outcomes relate to course outcomes
• Assessment summary
• Assessment details: Full details for each assessment item
Section 3: Learning and Teaching Activities See Page 2
Section 4: Learning Resources See Section 1 for Texbook, Readings etc.
• Literacy and/or numeracy resources
Section 5: Expectations Of and By You See SSAPguide
UNIT REQUIREMENTS
Internet Access: You must have internet access for this unit, preferably high speed broadband (or use University facilities)
vUWS: You must access the unit vUWS site at least twice a week to check for any new content or announcements
iPad: Owning an iPad is strongly recommended, as some units are optimised for iPad
FREE ADOBE READER: This Learning Guide is an Adobe PDF document with internal attachments. To access attachments you may need
to download and open it in latest FREE Adobe Reader, available at http://get.adobe.com/reader/
You MUST use free Adobe reader app to access attachments on iPad.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 1 of 15
Unit Weekly Schedule
(Link to Handbook and timetable for unit: http://handbook.uws.edu.au/hbook/unit.aspx?unit=102038.2)
Week Starts Lecture Tutorial Reading Assessment
1
20/7/2015
Introduction to Crime
Prevention and Community No Tutorial
Sutton, Cherney
and White (2014)
Chapter 1
2
27/7/2015
Theories and Foundations
of Crime Prevention
Discuss the origins and theoretical
foundations of crime prevention
Sutton, Cherney
and White (2014)
Chapter 2
3
3/8/2015
Fear of Crime, Politics and
Crime Policy
Discuss the relationships between
fear of crime, law and order politics
and crime prevention
Lee (2007)
4
10/8/2015
Social and Community
Crime Prevention
Discuss social and community crime
prevention
Sutton, Cherney
and White (2014)
Chapter 3
5
17/8/2015
Situational Crime
Prevention Discuss situational crime prevention Clarke (1997)
6
24/8/2015
Crime Prevention Through
Environmental Design
(CPTED)
Discuss CPTED Crowe (2013)
7
31/8/2015
Preventive and Community
Policing
Discuss different policing strategies
and their impact on police/
community relations
Cameron (1990)
and Buerger and
Mazzerole (1998)
8
7/9/2015
Planning and Crime
Prevention Partnerships
Discuss the development of crime
prevention networks and the
increasing role of crime prevention in
local governance
Lee and Herborn
(2003) and
Cherney (2004)
Assessment 1:
Research Exercise, due BEFORE
5pm Friday September 11,
2015 (online submission via
Turnitin).
9
14/9/2015 SESSION BREAKNO
LECTURES OR TUTORIALS
10
21/9/2015
The Crime Prevention
Industry
Discuss the growth of the industry of
crime control Christie (2000)
11
28/9/2015
Alternative Modes of Crime
Prevention: Restorative
Justice and Reintegrative
Shaming
DIscuss restorative justice and
reintegrative shaming in relation to
crime prevention
Shapland and
Robinson (2008)
and
Harris (2006)
12
5/10/2015
Evaluating Crime
Prevention
Discuss the range of different forms,
and the and importance of
evaluation to crime prevention.
Sutton, Cherney
and White (2014)
Chapter 5
Assessment 2a, due BEFORE 5pm
Tuesday 6 October, 2015 (online
submission via Turnitin).
13
12/10/2015
The Future of Crime
Prevention
Discuss current trends in crime
prevention and the future trajectory
of crime prevention strategies
Zedner (2007)
14
19/10/2015
No Lecture (prepare for
your final assessment) Discuss final assessment No Reading Assessment 2b, due BEFORE
5pm Friday October 23,
2015 (online submission via
Turnitin).
15
26/10/2015 STUVAC Student exam study vacation
1618
2/11/2015 FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIOD
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 2 of 15
SECTION ONE: Unit Information
Unit Number 102038
Unit Name 102038Crime
Prevention and Community
Unit Coordinator Phillip Wadds
Credit Points 10
Session Spring 2015
Introduction
Introduction:
This unit will examine the theory, politics and practice of crime prevention. It will
address current approaches to crime prevention, evaluate their effectiveness and
examine emerging strategies in the field. The unit will consider the role that
community plays in the management and prevention of crime, while also discussing
the challenges posed by unreported crime, fear of crime and the relation between
patterens of victimisation and social disadvantage. The unit will draw on empirical
literature linking individual, social and contextual factors to the production and
prevention of deviant behaviours and explore different crime prevention strategies
for alleviating the social ills associated with crime and delinquency.
Key contacts for this unit:
Lecturer/ Unit Coordinator:
Dr Phillip Wadds
Location: Bankstown Campus, room 1.G.35
Email: p.wadds@uws.edu.au
Phone: (02) 9772 6299
Tutors:
Sarah EastlakeSmiths.
eastlakesmith@
uws.edu.au
Chris Joycecjoyce@
anglicare.org.au
Christine Leechristine.
lee@uws.edu.au
Kristin Moorek.
moore@uws.edu.au
Bridget Mottramb.
mottram@uws.edu.au
Amrita Mukhopadhyaya.
mukhopadhyay@uws.edu.au
Helen Ryanh.
ryan@uws.edu.au
Gina Vizzag.
vizza@uws.edu.au
Attachments in this document are:
• SSAPguide
This is a VERY important attachment that forms part of the Learning Guide.
Please read it VERY carefully as it has lots of important information, including
how to contact the School, and all the requirements regarding assessments
(requesting an extension, Special Consideration, late penalties, etc.)
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 3 of 15
Consultation
C onsultation for this unit is by appointment via email with Dr Phillip Wadds. Please
email Dr Wadds at p.wadds@uws.edu.au if you would like to arrange a constulation
time throughout the semester. This semester, Dr Wadds will be offering both facetoface
and online consultation via Zoom. If you would like to arrange a Zoom
consultation (software similar to Skype), please download here http://uws.zoom.us/
A discussion board will also be made available on vUWS to discuss any issues that
arise during the semester. The unit coordinator and teaching staff will be regularly
monitoring these boards to make sure any concerns are addressed quickly and
accurately.
Improvements
This semester, as a result of student feedback, I have added a third assessable item
(attached to Assignment 2) in the form of an essay plan. This assignment is designed
to lessen the pressure of the previous 40%/60% split for the two assignments.
I have also added greater flexibility for consulation. The addition of an online
consultation option will allow students to have (digital) facetoface
interaction with
the Unit Coordinator without needing to travel.
As always, student feedback on this unit is welcome. I have established a forum in the
discussion board to allow for ongoing student feedback throughout the semester. A
lot of time has been put into the development of this unit, so please ensure that your
feedback is constructive.
Requirements
None
Delivery
The unit is delivered by means of:
Online Lecture: 1 hour per week online (no facetoface
lectures)
Tutorial: 1 hour per week facetoface
Online Activity: 1 hour per week
Attendance
Students are expected to watch all online lectures and attend all tutorials, to have
completed all readings and required activities prior to class, and to participate actively
in all tutorial activities. Failure to do so may seriously undermine a student’s ability to
complete the unit satisfactorily. Attendance records may be consulted in the assessment
of any requests for extensions or Special Consideration. You should advise the Unit
Coordinator or your tutor if you are unable to attend a tutorial due to illness or
misadventure.
A professional standard of behaviour is required at all times in tutorials.
This unit is worth 10 credit points, indicating that success in the unit requires at least 10
hours work per week. Three hours will be lecture/tutorial time and the weekly online
activity, while the remaining 7 hours should be devoted to reading and study,
assessment preparation, and revision.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 4 of 15
Textbook
Given the breadth of content covered in this unit, there is no texbook. All essential
reading materials and resources are provided in the ‘Readings and Resources’ tab in
vUWS. Copies of key texts from the reading list will be made available in the reserve
section of the UWS libray on both Bankstown and Penrith Campuses.
Readings
A full reading list can be found in the ‘Readings’ tab on the vUWS site.
Other Resources
Additional Readings:
Devery, C. (1991) Disadvantage and Crime in New South Wales. Bureau of Crime
Statistics and Research, Sydney.
Indemaur, D. (2000) `Violent Crime in Australia: Patterns and Politics’. Australian and
New Zealand Journal of Criminology, Vol.33, No.3 pp: 287299.
Mouzos, J & Makkai, T. (2004.) Women’s experiences of male violence in
Australia. Australian Institute of Criminology, Canberra.
Van Kesteren, J., Mayhew, P. & Nieuwbeerta, P. (2000) Criminal Victimisation in
Seventeen Industrialised Countries. Ministry of Justice, Hague
Lee, M. (2005) Inventing the Fear of Crime. Devon: Willan.
Hope, T. & Sparks, R. eds. (2000) Crime, Risk and Insecurity. London: Routledge.
Young, J. (1999) The Exclusive Society. London: Sage.
Garland, D. (2001) Culture of Control. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Clarke, R. (1997) Situational Crime Prevention.Albany, New York: Harrow & Heston.
Hughes, G., McLaughlin, E., & Muncie, J. (2002) (eds.) Crime Prevention and Community
Safety. London: Sage.
Weblinks:
Attorney General’s Department http://
www.crimeprevention.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx
Australian Institute of Criminologyhttp://
www.aic.gov.au/crime_types/in_focus/crimeprevention.html
Australian Federal Policehttp://
www.afp.gov.au/policing/cybercrime/
crimeprevention.
aspx
Crime Prevention NSWhttp://
www.crimeprevention.nsw.gov.au/cpd/index.html
NSW Policehttp://
www.police.nsw.gov.au/community_issues/crime_prevention
Referencing
The referencing requirement for units in Social Science is the Harvard style. Full details
on the Harvard style of referencing can be found
at: http://library.uws.edu.au/FILES/cite_Harvard.pdf
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 5 of 15
SECTION TWO: Assessment Information
Course Outcomes Click on this link to see the courselevel
learning outcomes (or graduate attributes)
you need to have attained when you graduate: http://tinyurl.com/ssapclo
Unit Outcomes After successful completion of this Unit, students will be able to:
1. Critically analyse policies and practices regarding crime prevention.
2. Evaluate the links between victimisation from crime, fear of crime and
social disadvantage;
3. Articulate the links between victimisation and different crime prevention
measures and evaluate the possible strengths and weaknesses of these
measures.
Unit to Course This unit and its unit outcomes relate to the learning outcomes of the course as
shown in the relevant Table of the Course Outcomes link above.
Assessment Assessment Overview:
Assessment Worth Length Outcomes Threshold
1 Case Study 30% 1,000 words 1 No
2a Essay Plan 15% 500 words 2,3 No
2b Essay 55% 1,500 words 2, 3 No
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 6 of 15
ASSESSMENT ONE
A1 Assessment Assessment 1: Research Exercise (1,000 words /+10%
) Worth: 30%
A1 Due BEFORE Friday 11 September, 2015, 5:00 PM
A1 Submission
Submission:
This assignment is to be submitted and will be returned via the Turnitin link on vUWS. There is no hardcopy
submission.
Late Penalty:
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will attract a
late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the penalty will
be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment
task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social Science
Student Resources document for policy surrounding extension and special consideration requests.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5)
regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments.
A1 Description
CASE STUDY: Kings Cross Shooting
At 4am on Saturday 21st April 2012, police patrolling the main drag of the Kings Cross nightclub precinct
recognised the 14 year old driver of a stolen car, who had been known to the police since he was eight.
The car contained the driver and five passengers ranging in age from 13 to 24, all Indigenous and living in
Redfern. To avoid the police, the 14 year old driver mounted the footpath and drove along it for 100m
with police chasing on foot. Two pedestrians were struck, one of whom was dragged under the car for 10
metres. The car then returned to the road and collided with a taxi. It is unclear whether the car was
moving at this point but the police fired a number of shots into the vehicle in ‘an attempt to protect’ the
trapped pedestrian. The 14 year old driver was shot in the chest and arm and a 17 year old passenger was
shot in the neck. Footage has emerged apparently showing an officer dragging the passenger from the car
and punching him in the face (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUoy4LT0U0M). It was afterwards
reported that Kings Cross police were ‘hyped’ and on high alert on Friday night, with 20 extra police
officers rostered, in preparation of an anticipated outbreak of bikiegang
violence (SMH 2012).
Write a critical account, in essay format, of how this incident may have been prevented through ONE of
the following crime prevention strategies:
• Social prevention methods (eg community crime prevention, developmental crime prevention etc.)
• Preventive policing (eg. community policing, problemoriented
policing, hotspot
policing etc.)
• Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) – you will need to look at environmental
design features of the Kings Cross nightclub precinct through Google Earth for example, or via a field trip
to Kings Cross)
Your essay should demonstrate why the crime prevention strategy chosen for this particular situation is
the best one, as well as acknowledging any limitations of that particular approach. You are encouraged to
take stock of the publicity around this case and consider the different issues raised by the media, police
and other actors (eg political figures) that might be relevant to your chosen crime prevention strategy.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 7 of 15
• You are encouraged to do some media research on the case study but this is NOT a substitute for
academic sources
• You are encouraged to use government policy documents, statistics etc.
A1 Criteria
Marking rubric, standards & criteria
Your work will be marked according to the following criteria:
• Your ability to address the essay question;
• The clarity and sophistication of argument;
• Evidence of having read and understood relevant literature;
• Evidence of critical thinking and engagement with theory;
• Ability to write clearly and reference appropriately to university standards.
Style & Presentation – Some Dos and Don’ts
1. ESSAY PREPARATIONS AND RESEARCH:
• You need to relate your essay to the specific topic provided in thisGuide. You cannot create your
own topic. Itis essentialthat you read the instructionsfor your assignment.
• You are expected to have basic knowledge about how to do academic research (both online and in
the Library). If you would like help, or are unsure about how to research academic material, please
ask either your unit coordinator or tutor for help. If you do require help, please ensure that you
that approach your teaching staff well before the assignment due date.
• Wikipedia is not an academic source!
• Make sure you follow the Harvard referencing style guide from the UWS Library website.
• Preparation is key to good writing. The more time you spend mapping out your assignment, the more
likely it is that you will produce a coherent and convincing argument.
2. ESSAY STRUCTURE, CONTENT AND PRESENTATION:
• Your essay should be 1.5 or double spaced.
• Your assignment should be sufficiently titled so as to indicate the question you have selected.
• Your reference list must be included at the end of your essay. Failure to include a reference list can
result in an automatic failure and can constitute serious academic misconduct.
• Avoid overly long sentences and . Simple is better.
3. BEFORE SUBMISSION:
• You need to read your essay prior to submission. If it doesn’t make sense to you, it won’t make sense
to your marker either.
• RUN A SPELLING AND GRAMMAR CHECK.
• Make sure all your references are fully and properly acknowledged (including page numbers for
direct quotations).
For more guidance, please see the Assignment Writing Guide in the Assessments tab on vUWS
Instructions:
• Must use at least 8 academic sources
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 8 of 15
HD D C P F
Question50%
Accurate,
comprehensive
and articulate
critical
engagement with
the assigned
questions.
Analysis shows
originality of
thought.
Accurate and
wellarticulated
responses to the
assigned
questions which
provide original
insights.
Evidence of
critical
engagement.
Mostly adequate
responses to the
assigned
questions. Some
evidence of
critical
engagement.
Some adequate
responses, but
with errors and
little to no
critical
engagement.
Answers
mostly wrong
and fail to
engage with
the assigned
questions.
Research20%
Outstanding
research and a
sound grasp of
the key
theoretical and
conceptual
content to
emerge from the
literature.
Relevant and
thoughtful
integration of
research. Exceeds
minimum
reference count.
Considerable
research and
effort. Displays
an
understanding of
the key material.
Relevant
integration of
research.
Exceeds
minimum
reference count
Good attempt to
research, but
some
inconsistencies in
application.
Meets the
minimum
reference count.
Adequate effort
and research.
Meets the
minimum
reference
count.
Little or no
research and
effort. Does
not reach the
minimum
reference
count.
Structure10%
Exceptional
structure. Each
point clearly links
to the next and
has a strong
narrative flow.
Clear structure
and strong
narrative flow.
Logical structure. Uneven
structure with
little thought to
narrative flow.
Little/no
structure.
Expression10%
Professional
standard of
writing.
Exceptional
grammar and
written
expression. Very
few to no errors.
Any errors are
very minor in
nature.
Excellent
standard of
writing. Very few
to few errors
with expression
and grammar.
Any errors are
minor in nature.
Good standard of
writing.
Argument is
clear, but some
minor errors with
expression and
grammar.
Adequate
standard of
writing but
some problems
with expression
and grammar.
Some argument
unclear and
poorly
expressed.
Writing is
difficult to read
with major
flaws with
expression and
grammar.
Referencing
10%
Professional
standard of intext
citations and
bibliography is
flawless.
Excellent
standard of intext
citations and
bibliography.
Very few errors
Good standard of
referencing, but
some formatting
errors.
A number of
formatting
errors both intext
and in the
bibliography.
Poor/no
references.
Does not
follow Harvard
and any errors
are very minor in
nature.
Not all
referencing
consistent with
Harvard format.
referencing
format.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 9 of 15
ASSESSMENT TWO
A2 Assessment Assessment 2a: Essay PlanAnnotated
Bibliography (500 words /+10%)
Worth: 15%
A2 Due BEFORE Tuesday 06 October, 2015, 5:00 PM
A2 Submission
Submission:
This assignment is to be submitted via the Turnitin link on vUWS. There is no hardcopy submission.
Late Penalty:
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will attract
a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the
penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked
assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social
Science Student Resources document for policy surrounding extension and special consideration requests.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5)
regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments.
A2 Description
The Essay Plan (Assessment 2a) is based on the essay questions for Assessment 2b (see below). Students
are to provide an annotated bibliography for one of the four set essay questions. This will require students
to undertake an independent literature review to supplement the key readings from the unit that are
relevant to the assigned questions. Students will be assessed on their understanding of the key
themes/concepts raised in the selected readings and their expression of how each selected article is
relevant to the selected question. Students must produce an annotated bibliographic entry for 5
references. Of these 5 references a maximum of 2 references can be drawn from the weekly reading list.
The remaining articles must be drawn from an independent literature search. Students are encouraged to
use the library catalogues to assist with this task. More guidance on how to conduct an annotated
bibliography and the best places to look for relevant academic literature will be available for student in
the Assessment tab on vUWS.
The following content must be provided for each reference:
Full reference in Harvard Style:
Summary of key points:
Relevance of reference to selected question:
Remember, the word count for this assignment is only 500 words (excluding the full references and
headings). This will require students to write in a clear and concise manner, and to carefully select what
information they include in each entry.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 10 of 15
A2 Criteria
Marking rubric, standards & criteria
Your work will be marked according to the following criteria:
HD D C P F
Critical
Assessment/
Understanding
of References
50%
Accurate,
comprehensive
and critical
engagement with
the selected
references.
Accurate and
wellarticulated
summaries of
the selected
references.
Evidence of
critical
engagement
with the
selected
material.
Mostly
adequate
summaries of
the selected
references.
Some evidence
of critical
engagement
with the
selected
material.
Some adequate
summaries, but
with errors and
little to no
critical
engagement.
Answers
mostly wrong
and fail to
engage with
the assigned
questions.
Research and
Relevance30%
Reference
selection clearly
demonstrates a
strong
understanding of
the key concepts
related to the
selected
question.
Reference
selection
demonstrates a
goodstrong
understanding
of the key
concepts related
to the selected
question.
Reference
selection shows
a gooddeveloping
understanding
of the key
concepts related
to the selected
question.
Reference
selection
mostly relevant
to the selected
question.
Reference
selection is
poor and
seems rushed
and/or poorly
thought out.
Expression10%
Professional
standard of
writing.
Exceptional
grammar and
written
expression. Very
few to no errors.
Any errors are
very minor in
nature.
Excellent
standard of
writing. Very
few to few
errors with
expression and
grammar. Any
errors are minor
in nature.
Good standard
of writing.
Argument is
clear, but some
minor errors
with expression
and grammar.
Adequate
standard of
writing but
some problems
with expression
and grammar.
Some argument
unclear and
poorly
expressed.
Writing is
difficult to
read with
major flaws
with
expression and
grammar.
Referencing10%
Professional
standard of
citations.
Excellent
standard of
citations. Very
few errors and
any errors are
very minor in
nature.
Good standard
of referencing,
but some
formatting
errors.
A number of
formatting
errors. Not all
referencing
consistent with
Harvard
format.
Poor
referencing.
Does not
follow Harvard
referencing
format.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 11 of 15
ASSESSMENT THREE
A3 Assessment Assessment 2b: Essay (1500 words /+10%)
Worth: 55%
A3 Due BEFORE Friday 23 October, 2015, 5:00 PM
A3 Submission
Submission:
This assignment is to be submitted via the Turnitin link on vUWS. There is no hardcopy submission.
Late Penalty:
If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will attract
a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the
penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked
assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time.
Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social
Science Student Resources document for policy surrounding extension and special consideration requests.
Is assessment compulsory?
Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5)
regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments.
A3 Description
Choose and answer ONE of the following questions :
Option 1. Recent crime prevention policy and initiatives can be seen as highly politicised. Discuss the link
between law and order politics, fear of crime and crime prevention strategy using local examples.
Option 2. Citing examples, provide a critical analysis of preventive policing strategies (ie. Hotspot, zerotolerance,
problemoriented
policing etc.) and discuss their impact on the community. In your answer,
discuss why these strategies are popular and if there are any sideeffects
on police/community relations?
Option 3. The crime prevention industry is growing at a rapid pace in Australia and around the world.
Critically discuss this trend and outline some of the key dangers that may emerge from the
commercialisation of crime control.
Option 4. Discuss the importance of evaluation to crime prevention strategy. Why is it so important in
producing effective crime policy and prevention strategies?
Your essay should critically examine the key subject matter and clearly display your understanding of the
relevant material covered throughout the semester.
Instructions:
• Must use at least 10 academic sources.
• You must engage with the key texts used throughout this unit.
• You are encouraged to do some media research to support your argument when it is relevant, but
this is NOT a substitute for academic sources.
• You are encouraged to use government policy documents, statistics etc.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 12 of 15
• Your ability to address the essay question;
• The clarity and sophistication of argument;
• Evidence of having read and understood relevant literature;
• Evidence of critical thinking and engagement with theory;
• Ability to write clearly and reference appropriately to university standards.
Style & Presentation – Some Dos and Don’ts
1. ESSAY PREPARATIONS AND RESEARCH:
• You need to relate your essay to the specific topic provided in thisGuide. You cannot create your
own topic. Itis essentialthat you read the instructionsfor your assignment.
• You are expected to have basic knowledge about how to do academic research (both online and in
the Library). If you would like help, or are unsure about how to research academic material, please
ask either your unit coordinator or tutor for help. If you do require help, please ensure that you
that approach your teaching staff well before the assignment due date.
• Wikipedia is not an academic source!
• Make sure you follow the Harvard referencing style guide from the UWS Library website.
• Preparation is key to good writing. The more time you spend mapping out your assignment, the more
likely it is that you will produce a coherent and convincing argument.
2. ESSAY STRUCTURE, CONTENT AND PRESENTATION:
• Your essay should be 1.5 or double spaced.
• Your assignment should be sufficiently titled so as to indicate the question you have selected.
• Your reference list must be included at the end of your essay. Failure to include a reference list can
result in an automatic failure and can constitute serious academic misconduct.
• Avoid overly long sentences and . Simple is better.
3. BEFORE SUBMISSION:
• You need to read your essay prior to submission. If it doesn’t make sense to you, it won’t make sense
to your marker either.
• RUN A SPELLING AND GRAMMAR CHECK.
• Make sure all your references are fully and properly acknowledged (including page numbers for
direct quotations).
A3 Criteria
Marking rubric, standards & criteria
Your work will be marked according to the following criteria:
For more guidance, please see the Assignment Writing Guide in the Assessments tab on vUWS
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 13 of 15
HD D C P F
Question60%
Accurate,
comprehensive
and articulate
critical
engagement with
the assigned
questions.
Analysis shows
originality of
thought.
Accurate and
wellarticulated
responses to the
assigned
questions which
provide original
insights.
Evidence of
critical
engagement.
Mostly adequate
responses to the
assigned
questions. Some
evidence of
critical
engagement.
Some adequate
responses, but
with errors and
little to no
critical
engagement.
Answers
mostly wrong
and fail to
engage with
the assigned
questions.
Research10%
Outstanding
research and a
sound grasp of
the key
theoretical and
conceptual
content to
emerge from the
literature.
Relevant and
thoughtful
integration of
research. Exceeds
minimum
reference count.
Considerable
research and
effort. Displays
an
understanding of
the key material.
Relevant
integration of
research.
Exceeds
minimum
reference count
Good attempt to
research, but
some
inconsistencies in
application.
Meets the
minimum
reference count.
Adequate effort
and research.
Meets the
minimum
reference
count.
Little or no
research and
effort. Does
not reach the
minimum
reference
count.
Structure10%
Exceptional
structure. Each
point clearly links
to the next and
has a strong
narrative flow.
Clear structure
and strong
narrative flow.
Logical structure. Uneven
structure with
little thought to
narrative flow.
Little/no
structure.
Expression10%
Professional
standard of
writing.
Exceptional
grammar and
written
expression. Very
few to no errors.
Any errors are
very minor in
nature.
Excellent
standard of
writing. Very few
to few errors
with expression
and grammar.
Any errors are
minor in nature.
Good standard of
writing.
Argument is
clear, but some
minor errors with
expression and
grammar.
Adequate
standard of
writing but
some problems
with expression
and grammar.
Some argument
unclear and
poorly
expressed.
Writing is
difficult to read
with major
flaws with
expression and
grammar.
Referencing
10%
Professional
standard of intext
citations and
bibliography is
flawless.
Excellent
standard of intext
citations and
bibliography.
Very few errors
and any errors
Good standard of
referencing, but
some formatting
errors.
A number of
formatting
errors both intext
and in the
bibliography.
Not all
referencing
Poor/no
references.
Does not
follow Harvard
referencing
format.
are very minor in
nature.
consistent with
Harvard format.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 14 of 15
SECTION THREE: Teaching and Learning Activities
For your convenience the Learning and Teaching Schedule is on the second page of the Learning Guide.
Section 4 SECTION FOUR: Learning Resources
For your convenience the following are listed in Section 1 with other Unit Information:
• Textbook
• Readings
• Any additional resources
• Referencing requirements.
Literacy
None other than those in the SSAPguide
Section 5 SECTION FIVE: Expectations of You, and By You
See SSAPguide for:
• Expectations of students
• Expectations of UWS staff
• Raising concerns
• Links to key policies.
School of Social Sciences and Psychology Learning Guide Page 15 of 15

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Family, Communication, and Mealtimes

Family, Communication, and Mealtimes

Family, Communication, and Mealtimes
1. The terms “disintegration” and “breakdown” are often used in discussing families these days.    Are families disintegrating?  Breaking down? Explain your answer and reasoning in a detailed paragraph.
2. Summarize the research found in the article entitled “Do Family Meals Really Make a Difference? (Cook and Dunifon, 2012) provided by clicking this link http://www.human.cornell.edu/pam/outreach/upload/Family-Mealtimes-2.pdfIn your summary be sure to note which finding was most compelling to you and why. What can you do now or in the future to ensure more family mealtime?  Be descriptive in your response.
3. First read the “Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 9 – Interpersonal Communication” (pp. 7-9) found herehttps://umuc.equella.ecollege.com/file/53b837fe-ef8b-468d-8a6c-a9ae70aa0c11/1/Chapter9_InterpersonalCommunication.pdf  and then answer these questions.   Does Pearson’s definition of family fit your own?  Why?  Why not?

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Book Review; Directive Informational Behaviors

Book Review; Directive Informational Behaviors

Paper details:
Read chapter 8, chapter 9, chapter 11. After reading (chapter 8,9,11) answer questions.

Chapter 8: Directive Informational Behaviors
Respond to these items after reading chapter 8

1.    Both directive control supervision and directive informational supervision use the same seven behaviors. Which behaviors are applied differently in the directive informational com-pared to the directive control approach, and how are they applied differently?

2.    As you read about the supervisory behaviors used in the directive informational approach, which ones would you like to discuss or see demonstrated before you practice directive in-formational behaviors in a role play?

Chapter 9: Collaborative Behaviors
Respond to these items after reading Chapter 9.
1.    Both the teacher and supervisor participating in a collaborative conference discuss their perception of the problem, but the supervisor asks the teacher to share first. What are the advantages of the teacher sharing first?

2.    What circumstances require that a supervisor should definitely use collaborative behaviors? (4)

Chapter 11: Developmental Supervision
Respond to these items after reading chapter 11
Developmental supervision practices involve three key phases: (1)choosing a supervisory approach, (2) applying the selected approach, and (3) fostering teacher development.

A school leader’s decisions, whether implicit or explicit, regarding his/her developmental supervision approaches have an impact on professional relationships and the school’s learning environment. Directive, collaborative, and nondirective behaviors characterize the school leader’s chosen approach and the subsequent interactions with other school personnel.

1.    Is matching the correct supervisory approach to a particular teacher or group more of a ­science or an art, or is it a balance of science and art? Explain your response.

2.    Which of the four supervisory approaches would you be most comfortable using? Which approach would you be least comfortable using?

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River City Advocacy

River City Advocacy

Paper details:
Summary of a LINK Article from NOHS Website Students are required to select one (1) article from the The Link newsletter (available via the NOHS website) and summarize its main points as well as provide analysis on the topic. A cover page is required, but no abstract or additional sources are needed; otherwise, the paper should follow APA format. The article should be printed and attached to the back of the summary. (2-3 pages double-spaced). Article Summary Grading Rubric:- Accurately describes main points of the article in a succinct yet comprehensive manner, as well as provides analysis on the article’s topic: Demonstrates college level writing (grammar, spelling, page length requirements, etc.) and APA formatting: (i have copied and pasted NOHS article into word document and attached under materials)

River City Advocacy
MeridethMcCallick Erickson

River City Advocacy, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in New Braunfels, Texas specializing in recovery support services for people with persistent mental and behavioral health issues and various developmental difficulties. We are a Consumer Operated Service Provider with 50% of our staff and 100% of our governing board having lived experience with persistent mental health issues. River City Advocacy provides our services at little to no cost for our consumers; we serve the underserved, underinsured, and uninsured in our community. As the Executive Director, I strive to reduce stigma associated with persistent mental illness, behavioral health issues, and developmental difficulties in our community through community awareness efforts. At River City Advocacy, we provide peer based mental health recovery support systems needed in our community. Our vision is to advocate, educate, and facilitate acceptance of mental health issues. We offer free peer support, person centered recovery planning, support groups, lifeskills workshops, career and job coaching, computer skills training, and art therapy. Our individual, couple, and family counseling services are offered based on a sliding scale fee system. Our socialization opportunities assist with life and social skills and offer a sense of community and acceptance. Mental health issues are more common than heart disease, lung disease, and cancer combined. It is estimated that one in four Americans will have a diagnosable mental disorder at some point in their lives. Former President Bill Clinton said, “Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of, but stigma and bias shame us all.” Stigma is a cluster of negative attitudes and beliefs that motivate the public to fear, reject, avoid, and discriminate against people with mental illnesses. What is a Mental Illness? Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others, and daily functionality. Just as diabetes is a disorder of the pancreas, mental illnesses are medical conditions that often result in a reduced capacity for coping with the ordinary demands of life. Serious mental illnesses include major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, PTSD, and borderline personality disorder. Mental illness recovery is possible. Mental illness does not discriminate; it can affect people of any age, race, religion, and/or socioeconomic status. The general public needs to understand that mental illnesses are NOT the result of personal weakness, lack of character, or poor upbringing. Mental illness is treatable, and most people diagnosed with a mental illness can and do experience relief from their symptoms by actively participating in an individualized recovery treatment plan. In addition to psychosocial treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy, individual therapy, or counseling, peer support groups assist consumers with recovery. Page 6 Volume 35, Issue 2 LINK Here are some important facts about mental illness and recovery from the National Alliance on Mental Illness website: • Mental illnesses are serious medical illnesses. Even though mental illness is widespread in the population, the main burden of illness is concentrated in a much smaller proportionabout 6 percent, or 1 in 17 Americans-who live with a serious mental illness. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that one in four adults-approximately 57.7 million Americans-experience a mental health disorder in a given year. • The World Health Organization has reported that four of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. By 2020, Major Depressive illness will be the leading cause of disability in the world for women and children. • Mental illness usually strikes individuals in the prime of their lives, often during adolescence and young adulthood. All ages are susceptible, but the young and the old are especially vulnerable. • Without treatment the consequences of mental illness for the individual and society are staggering: unnecessary disability, unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, inappropriate incarceration, suicide and wasted lives. The economic cost of untreated mental illness is more than 100 billion dollars each year in the United States. What is Peer Support? By definition, peer support is getting help from someone who has been through similar situations, illnesses, etc. People that have similar experiences may be able to listen, give hope, and guidance toward recovery in a way that is different, and may be just as valuable as professional services. In addition to the direct services one may receive, many peerrun organizations advocate to improve opportunities for people recovering from mental illnesses. Peer support programs like River City Advocacy, Inc. strengthen primary care practice and community health by reaching the vulnerable populations and reducing health disparities. We offer a variety of peer support groups with the hope of meeting the recovery needs of mental health consumers in the community. What happens in a Support Group? The Support Groups are the core of River City Advocacy’s programming. In support group meetings consumers meet in a friendly, nonthreatening environment that we like to call the “judgment free zone.” The meetings run for about an hour, and we ensure confidentiality for all of the participants. We encourage active participation, however if a consumer is not quite ready to share, then they do not have to. When thoughts and emotions are shared, encouragement is offered in a variety of ways; we do not say “you need to do X, Y, Z” or pass judgment; this is a time for facilitators and peers to step in and help them to come up with positive solutions to their issues. Facilitators are licensed professional counselor interns and certified peer support specialists. At River City Advocacy we meet our consumers where they are and help them realize they are MORE than a diagnosis.

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CHAPTER 06Capital Allocation to Risky Assets

CHAPTER 06Capital Allocation to Risky Assets

.Consider a risky portfolio. The end-of-year cash flow derived from the portfolio will be either $50,000 or $150,000, with equal probabilities of .5. The alternative riskless investment in T-bills pays 5%. (LO 5-3)
a. If you require a risk premium of 10%, how much will you be willing to pay for the portfolio?
b. Suppose the portfolio can be purchased for the amount you found in (a). What will the expected rate of return on the portfolio be?

. Consider a portfolio that offers an expected rate of return of 12% and a standard deviation of 18%. T-bills offer a risk-free 7% rate of return. What is the maximum level of risk aversion for which the risky portfolio is still preferred to bills?

Please answer the following questions3 to 7 based on the following assumption: you manage a risky portfolio with an expected rate of return of 17% and a standard deviation of 27%. The T-bill rate is 7%.
. Your client chooses to invest 70% of a portfolio in your fund and 30% in a T-bill money market fund.  (LO 5-3)
a. What is the expected return and standard deviation of your client’s portfolio?
b. Suppose your risky portfolio includes the following investments in the given proportions:
Stock    Given Proportions
Stock A    27%
Stock B    33%
Stock C    40%

What are the investment proportions of your client’s overall portfolio, including the position in T-bills?
c. What is the reward-to-volatility ratio ( S ) of your risky portfolio and your client’s overall portfolio?
d. Draw the CAL of your portfolio on an expected return/standard deviation diagram. What is the slope of the CAL? Show the position of your client on your fund’s CAL.
.. Suppose the same client in the previous problem decides to invest in your risky portfolio
a proportion ( y ) of his total investment budget so that his overall portfolio will have an expected rate of return of 15%.  (LO 5-3)
a. What is the proportion y?
b. What are your client’s investment proportions in your three stocks and the T-billfund?
c. What is the standard deviation of the rate of return on your client’s portfolio?

.. Suppose the same client as in the previous problem prefers to invest in your portfolio aproportion(y ) that maximizes the expected return on the overall portfolio subject to the constraint that the overall portfolio’s standard deviation will not exceed 20%.  (LO 5-3)
a. What is the investment proportion, y?
b. What is the expected rate of return on the overall portfolio?

.. You estimate that a passive portfolio invested to mimic the S&P 500 stock index yields an expected rate of return of 13% with a standard deviation of 25%. Draw the CML and your fund’s CAL on an expected return/standard deviation diagram.  (LO 5-4)
a. What is the slope of the CML?
b. Characterize in one short paragraph the advantage of your fund over the passive fund.

. Your client (see previous problem) wonders whether to switch the 70% that is invested in your fund to the passive portfolio.  (LO 5-4)
a. Explain to your client the disadvantage of the switch.
b. Show your client the maximum fee you could charge (as a percent of the investment in your fund deducted at the end of the year) that would still leave him at least as well off investing in your fund as in the passive one. (Hint: The fee will lower the slope of your client’s CAL by reducing the expected return net of the fee.)

.. You manage an equity fund with an expected risk premium of 10% and a standard deviation of 14%. The rate on Treasury bills is 6%. Your client chooses to invest $60,000 of her portfolio in your equity fund and $40,000 in a T-bill money market fund.
a. What is the expected return and standard deviation of return on your client’s portfolio?  (LO 5-3)
b. What is the reward-to-volatility ratio for the equity fund in the previous problem?

CFA Problems
1. A portfolio of nondividend-paying stocks earned a geometric mean return of 5% between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011. The arithmetic mean return for the same period was 6%. If the market value of the portfolio at the beginning of 2005 was $100,000, what was the market value of the portfolio at the end of 2011?  (LO 5-1)
2. Which of the following statements about the standard deviation is/are  true? A standard deviation:  (LO 5-2)
a. Is the square root of the variance?
b. Is denominated in the same units as the original data.
c. Can be a positive or a negative number.

3. Which of the following statements reflects the importance of the asset allocation decision to the investment process? The asset allocation decision:  (LO 5-3)
a. Helps the investor decide on realistic investment goals.
b. Identifies the specific securities to include in a portfolio.
c. Determines most of the portfolio’s returns and volatility over time.
d. Creates a standard by which to establish an appropriate investment time horizon.

Use the following data in answering CFA Questions 4–6.
Investment    Expected Return, E(r)    Standard Deviation, s
1    .12    .30
2    .15    .50
3    .21    .16
4    .24    .21
Investor “satisfaction” with portfolio increases with expected return and decreases with variance according to the “utility” formula:  U 5 E(r) 2 ½ As2   where A = 4.
4. Based on the formula for investor satisfaction or “utility,” which investment would you select if you were risk averse with A = 4?  (LO 5-4)
5. Based on the formula above, which investment would you select if you were risk neutral?  (LO 5-4)
6. The variable (A) in the utility formula represents the:  (LO 5-4)
a. Investor’s return requirement.
b. Investor’s aversion to risk.
c. Certainty equivalent rate of the portfolio.
d. Preference for one unit of return per four units of risk.

Use the following scenario analysis for stocks X and Y to answer CFA Questions 7 through 9.

Bear Market    Normal Market    Bull Market
Probability       .2     .5     .3
Stock  X     -20%    18%    50%
Stock Y     -15%    20%    10%
7. What are the expected returns for stocks  X and  Y ?  (LO 5-2)

8. What are the standard deviations of returns on stocks  X and  Y ?  (LO 5-2)

9. Assume that of your $10,000 portfolio, you invest $9,000 in stock X and $1,000 in stock  Y. What is the expected return on your portfolio?  (LO 5-3)

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Amortization Problem

Amortization Problem

Chapter 3 HW Problem

JadaTech Inc. borrowed $60,000 at an interest of 3% per year.    JadaTech signed a contract to repay the loan in monthly payments in one year with the first payment starting one month from now.   Develop an amortization schedule for this loan.  Use the following format:
Interest due                                                 Principal paid
Period        Principal    at end of period    Payment    at end of period
1
2
Etc.

At the bottom of the schedule, show the following:
a. The total amount of interest paid ($)
b. The total amount of principal paid ($)

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curtral interview (MUSEUM)

curtral interview (MUSEUM)

Requirements:

Get approval from the instructor concerning who you will be interviewing by posting to the Interviewee Approval discussion board.
Review the example paper.
Interview the person using the interview question guide supplied. (You may also add some additional questions, however, remember to be respectful of cultural differences.)
Think about what struck you as interesting that you did not already know about the culture.
Research that aspect by providing at least 2 peer reviewed scholarly articles. (Wikipedia is NOT acceptable as a research source.) Peer reviewed scholarly articles can be found using the ODU library online search engines. Information on how to do this can be found on the ODU library website and some information is provided in the discussion area.
Writing the Paper:

This paper is to follow APA standard formatting, including running head and use college level grammar. It requires a title page and reference page following APA style (see example paper).
The body of the paper needs to be 3-4 pages in length (this does not include the title and reference pages.) APA standards include font size of 12, Times New Roman, double spaced and margins set at 1 inch, and content headers.
Please begin the paper by introducing your interviewee, the culture, and some basic details about the person and how you know them. Included in the introduction should also be a thesis statement about the research aspect of this assignment. (If you have a question about this, please ask in the questions about the course discussion board area.)
The first two thirds of your paper should be a narrative summary of the interview and what you have learned. Please remember to avoid conversational speech.
The final third of your paper should be concerning the research aspect of the paper. Introduce it by saying why the topic interested you and continue on with your findings remembering to use APA standards for in text citing.
A strong conclusion paragraph is expected tying together the interview and research.
It is highly recommended that you use the ODU writing center to help you polish your paper before submitting it for grading!!! They are available to online students and the information for contacting them can be found in the “Help” tab on the left hand side of the screen in the blackboard classroom for HMSV 339.

Here are the resources for the Cultural Interview Research Paper including the grading rubric, an example paper and

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